NY Law Scholarship

Funded by
Michelle Bodden-White
Learn more about the Donor
$1,000
1 winner$1,000
Awarded
Winner
1
Finalists
4
Application Deadline
Mar 30, 2022
Winners Announced
Apr 30, 2022
Education Level
Graduate
Recent Bold.org scholarship winners
Eligibility Requirements
Race:
Black student
Education Level:
Law school
State:
New York
Race:
Education Level:
State:
Black student
Law school
New York

Law school is an expensive and extensive commitment that requires intense work and high costs. 

Unfortunately, Black students are still underrepresented in law, with little progress being made in the last decade. In 2011, only 4.8% of attorneys were Black, and this figure has slightly decreased to just 4.7% in 2021.

This scholarship seeks to support a Black law student in New York to help with the costs of law school.

Any Black law student in New York who is committed to practicing law may apply for this scholarship, but first-generation students who are members of the Black Law Student Association are preferred.

To apply, tell us what inspired you to go to law school and how your background has shaped you. 

Published December 4, 2021
$1,000
1 winner$1,000
Awarded
Winner
1
Finalists
4
Application Deadline
Mar 30, 2022
Winners Announced
Apr 30, 2022
Education Level
Graduate
Recent Bold.org scholarship winners
Essay Topic

What has inspired you to go to law school and how has your background shaped you for success?

400–600 words

Winning Application

Natalie Mo
Fordham UniversityNew York, NY
I remember stepping onto the medical floor that day and hearing labored breathing and the staccato bark of dry coughing. It was 6:00 A.M. on April 15, 2020 and I had just started my first shift volunteering in the COVID-19 wards at Mount Sinai Hospital. As I started making my rounds, I became acutely aware of something disturbing: of the patients under my care, most of the faces that looked out at me from behind respirator masks were those of black or brown people. This was the start of my re-kindled interest in pursuing a degree in law. While COVID-19 has undoubtedly shed new light on the realities of medical racism, this was not the first time that I witnessed inequities in health care. When I was a medical student, I noticed how medical studies often excluded Black, Indigenous, and People of Color individuals. As such, I made it a mission to develop scholarship that addresses issues of discrimination in the healthcare system. For example, my book chapter, “Ethnic Differences in Skin Properties: The Objective Data”, in The Handbook of Cosmetic Science and Technology, was a path-breaking study that engaged the ways that different skin types respond to various medical treatments. Since so many medications are designed with only white people in mind, my medical research was once again tied to questions of inclusivity and social justice. Experiences such as these have shaped my career as a physician for over the last 15 years. In my New York City-based private practice, I specialize in treating skin of color, and I am committed to providing care irrespective of my patients’ insurance status or their financial circumstances. I have built my practice to be one which engages people of diverse backgrounds, as well as those who have been historically affected by racism and income inequality. My achievements were recently recognized in the New York Times article, “Dermatology Has a Problem with Skin of Color”, in which I am featured as a dermatologist who addresses the lack of racial inclusivity in the medical education curriculum that is taught to future physicians. I am also in the process of creating an online database that highlights physicians of color so that patients can more readily and easily connect with doctors who are attuned to their specific health care needs. While I am proud of the ways my practice has allowed me to engage problems of inequity on an individual-patient basis, I am now at a place in my career where I want to address these issues on a more systemic scale. Because of the structural dimension of medical inequity, a Juris Doctor degree in law would enable me to take an intersectional approach to addressing the legal aspects of the healthcare system in the United States to better advocate for those who lack a voice. Thus, I am particularly interested in focusing on public health and civil rights law, with an eye toward developing a non-profit, medical-legal, community-driven initiative that will advocate for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, as well as undocumented and uninsured immigrant populations, in receiving the physical and mental health care that they deserve.

FAQ

When is the scholarship application deadline?

The application deadline is Mar 30, 2022. Winners will be announced on Apr 30, 2022.

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